Twitter: ReadingDickens

Tonight, we drink Smoking Bishop! http://t.co/7WLOEF3H
about 1 year ago
“Bottle stands— pass it round”

“Bottle stands— pass it round”

“Bottle stands— pass it round—way of the sun—through the button hole—no heeltaps.”    -Mr. Jingle in The Pickwick Papers What larks!   Our first night of celebrating Dickensian conviviality was a big success.  Below are the drinks enjoyed by our guests (all recipes from Convivial Dickens, the Drinks of Dickens and...
Drinking with Dickens

Drinking with Dickens

  DRINKING WITH DICKENS A celebration of the Victorian conviviality of Charles Dickens “May we never want a friend in need, nor a bottle to give him!” –Captain Cuttle in Dombey and Son Join the Free Library’s Charles Dickens Ambassador Edward Pettit for an evening of conviviality in Dickensian style. Bars...
Philadelphia is the place to be for Dickensians in September

Philadelphia is the place to be for Dickensians in September

A very busy month at the Free Library of Philadelphia in September to celebrate the Charles Dickens Bicentenary: Paint the American Eagle One-Shot Productions will give three performances of their show, Paint the American Eagle, on Mon Sept 10 at 7PM, Tue Sept 11 at 7PM and Wed Sept 12 at 2PM:...
David Lean’s Great Expectations

David Lean’s Great Expectations

Very excited to introducing one of the greatest Dickens’ film adaptations, David Lean’s Great Expectations (1946) at the County Theater in Doylestown PA on Sept 13 and at the Ambler Theater in Ambler, PA on Sept 19.  More info here.  If you’ve never seen it, check out the opening sequence above.  One...
Dickens was glorious as Captain Bobadil

Dickens was glorious as Captain Bobadil

Today is the 440th birthday of Ben Jonson.  Dickens performed as Captain Bobadil from Jonson’s play Every Man in His Humour in a few productions with the Amateur Players, including 1847 benefits for the author Leigh Hunt. One audience member wrote, “Dickens was glorious.  He literally floated in braggadocio.  His air of supreme...
Death of Dickens

Death of Dickens

Today is the anniversary of Charles Dickens’ death.  He died on June 9, 1870 (142 years ago) after suffereing a stroke the day before.  I’ll be raising a toast to his memory. Here is John Forster’s account of Dickens’ last days: The few days at Gadshill had been given wholly...
A little touch of Dickens in the night

A little touch of Dickens in the night

Dickens is omnipresent in my life now.  Not only does my study have shelves full of books by and about Dickens, but paraphernalia has been increasing as I attempt to fully immerse myself in a Dickensian world.  A print of the The Old Curiosity Shop is perched amidst the clutter...
Clark Park Celebration

Clark Park Celebration

A statue of Charles Dickens with Little Nell looking up at him has resided in Clark Park in Philadelphia for over 100 years. The statue was sculpted a couple decades after Dickens’ death in 1870, however, since the author had requested no public memorials to his memory, the sculptor, Frank...
And so it begins with Pickwick

And so it begins with Pickwick

In which your humble Dickens reader discovers what Pickwickian means . . . I’m beginning my Dickens of a Year with The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club because I like the idea of beginning where his serial readers began.  Sketches by Bozwas published in book form (two volumes) a...
Dickens of a Year Reading Order

Dickens of a Year Reading Order

My order of reading will be as close as possible to the publication dates, meaning I’ll try to discover Dickens (in a compressed fashion) as his original readers did. I’ll make an exception for the Christmas books, which I’ll read this December. Here’s the order including some of the journalism, but...
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Barnaby’s Dream

Barnaby’s Dream

Terrifying nightmare illustration by Phiz (Hablot K Browne) in Chapter VII of Barnaby Rudge, called “Barnaby’s Dream.”  No wonder Barnaby’s not right in the head.  With dreams like these . . .

barnabys-dream

“the golden dog licking the golden pot”

“the golden dog licking the golden pot”

Catching up on my Dickens news feed, I found this item from a couple months ago:

The Dog and Pot sign was displayed above a shop on the southern corner of Union Street and Blackfriars Road for much of the 19th century until some time before the Second World War.

A replica is

Reading David Copperfield Part 1

Reading David Copperfield Part 1

As I’ve been reading David Copperfield, I’ve been taking notes which I had originally intended to post while I was reading the book, a kind of progressive log book for my reactions.  However, other commitments and the death of my computer at the start of April (my computer use is now relegated …

Zooks! Time to read some Robert Browning.

A couple months ago I read this piece in the Telegraph by Thomas Marks, reminding readers that Dickens is not the only writer celebrating a bicentennial this year.  Robert Browning, Victorian master poet of the dramatic dialogue, also was born 200 years ago this year (May 7, today!).  I am familiar with …

May is David Copperfield at the FLP

May is David Copperfield at the FLP

Our novel for the month at the Free Library of Philadelphia is David Copperfield, or to be more precise, The Personal History, Adventures, Experience and Observation of David Copperfield the Younger of Blunderstone Rookery (Which He Never Meant to Publish on Any Account.  Copperfield  is the most autobiographical of Dickens’ novels, and …